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Motorcyclists have long been separated into different groups – or tribes if you will – some of the more notorious of these includes the likes of Mods, Rockers and the Hells Angels, but there has not been such a divisive group since the latter that is until the Hipster bikers started to emerge. 

Despite the rise in hipster bikers, who some feel inject a sense of youth culture into the world of motorcyclists, mentioning them around another group and they will instantly dismiss them as ‘non-riders’. 

While ‘hipster bikers’ may not be seen amongst the peers as ‘real riders’ manufacturers have been keen to target this demographic in order to improve sales with young adults. 

Motorcycles such as Triumph’s Bonneville’s, the Yamaha SCR900, Moto Guzzi’s V7 and the BMW R nineT to name but a few have proven popular.

However hipsters are known to not follow the crowd or the market and just like any other area, hipster riders are afraid of choosing not to buck this trend with many choosing to purchase older motorcycles and modify them, i.e. bobbers, scramblers most of all cafe racers.

Experienced riders who have a problem with hipster riders is not due to the fact they buy old motorcycles, far from it, the issue is they buy old and modify them ‘taking the character out of the original.’

Hipster 

biker tribes

While bikers may not be known for safety minded riding gear, you would not expect to see a motorcyclist donning a pair of short, be it cargo, or sock-less Keds. Wearing such attire would certainly put this rider in the Hipster camp. The retro full-face helmet and the impossibly impractical handlebars are the tell here.

The Squid

Often seen as a group of bikers who perhaps have not spent any serious time learning how to manoeuvre a motorcycle or master their technique. Other stereotypes associated with ‘Squid’s’ include riding way too fast on public roads, pulling wheelies, owning an inline-four Japanese sport bike, and wearing no protective gear. In certain circles they’re deemed to give bikers a bad name.

The Moto Guzzi enthusiasts

biker tribes

Some say you’re not a true motorcycle enthusiast until you’ve owned a Moto Guzzi. These riders are their own special group. If these riders aren’t working, they’re probably riding somewhere. 

The Classic British rider

To be part of this group, you can’t be seen to ride a modern Norton nor Triumph. Only classic British motorcycles will do for this tribe, even when it comes to replacing parts on their beloved bikes.

The DIYers 

These riders are ready for any occasion and are always handy if a breakdown occurs. You may feel like a mechanic when changing your oil, but it pales in comparison to the knowledge these riders know about.

The Cruisers

biker tribes

Cruisers are the motorcycle equivalent to ‘Sunday drivers’, they’re not always riding a motorcycle when on the road. Often seen relaxing on long rides, but are not afraid to open the throttle. Supposedly most likely to be a lawyer, dentist or university professor by trade.

The Adventurer 

No terrain or location is too far for ‘the adventurer’. The Andes mountains? Easy. Machu Picchu? Forget about it. Unless you’re a fellow adventurer you’re unlikely to see these riders on UK roads. These riders prefer testing their riding skills internationally on a once in a lifetime journey, that will provide plenty of travel stories when they’re back home.

The Commuter 

Commuters will have every gadget, piece of luggage equipment and every item of protective gear imaginable. Usually found riding a BMW or perhaps a sport tourer. While wet and cold conditions may put some riders of travelling on two-wheels, ‘the commuter’ embraces any and all weather conditions.

The Philosopher

biker tribes

It’s not a mere two-wheeled contraption to this deep, thoughtful motorcyclist – it’s a living, breathing entity with a character all of its own. Philosophers are likely to be pretty decent riders, as they will spend time studying and perfecting techniques in an effort to ensure that man/woman and machine merge in exquisite harmony. 

Whether you fit into one of these modern day biker tribes or not, Bikesure has an insurance policy to fit your riding criteria.

Culture, Insurance, Motorbikes