Culture, Influx, Motorbikes

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For the past four weeks we’ve been taking a look at some of the biggest bike gangs (or clubs if you’d prefer) in America – examining their most famous exploits and their massive influence on biking across the globe.

This week though, to tie-in with the launch of the latest edition of Influx Magazine, we’ve turned our gaze across the Pacific to Japan, and one of their best-known gangs – Bōsōzoku.

With a name that translates literally as “violent speed tribe”, and a uniform inspired by samurai warriors and the dress of WW2 kamikaze pilots, it’s not hard to see why the Bōsōzoku have become one of the most feared and iconic elements of Japanese biker culture.

Their numbers may have dwindled down to around 9,000 members nationally from their peak in the 80s, but gang members are still a common sight on the streets of Japan, cruising on heavily-modified bikes, assaulting pedestrians, destroying property and holding up traffic.

Click the image below to go to see an in-depth guide to the Bōsōzoku.

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Interested in finding out more about Japanese bike culture?

Influx Magazine is currently on month two of its Japan triptych, looking at the different forms that motor culture takes in the Far East. This month the mag looks at Cherry’s Company, the Japanese customising garage that has won awards with its modified Harley-Davidson – there’s a video with the man behind the bike, a look at customising around the world and a profile of Harley’s head of styling too.

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